Giant Skeleton Of A Man 18 Feet Tall – Astounds Famous Anthropologists

Giant-Skeleton-Of-A-Man-18-Feet-Tall–Astounds-Famous-Anthropologists.

 

18 Foot Nephilim or one of the Black haired Giants that were killed off by the Red Haired Giants in America?


A-Giant-Skeleton-Eighteen-Feet-Tall
“A GIANT SKELETON EIGHTEEN FEET TALL”

AUSTIN, Tex.,  June 14.-“If the report that the fossilized giant 18 feet tall found near Seymour, Tex., is true, is it the most important ethical discovery ever made in the world,” remarked Dr. J. E. Pearce, professor of anthropology of the University of Texas. “It would break all previous records of giants by nearly 10 feet as the tallest man known to anthropological research was only 8 feet 5 inches in height.”
The skeleton is in possession of W.J. McKinney, Houston, Tex., oil prospector, who found it, and has been seen by a number of people who vouch for the size of the relic of a heretofore unknown race.McKinney, while making an excavation on the narrow watershed between – the Brazos and the Wichita rivers, came upon the fossilized skeleton near the surface. Mc-Kinney writes: “I estimate that this man weighed from 2,000 to 2,500 pounds. Accod-ing to my deductions he lived about 2,800 years ago. The skull is six times the size of that of an extraordinary man. McKinney does not explain how he arrived at the figures as to the probable period of the existence of this remarkable man. It is probable that the bones of the giant will be donated to the Smithsonian Institution, which, under the direction of Dr. J. Walter Fewkes, is now conducting anthropological research work in Texas.”

 

Dr. James Edward Pierce:
 

When Dr. Pearce first heard about the oil excavation, he said, “If the report that the fossilized skeleton of a giant eighteen feet tall has been found near Seymour TX, is true, it is the most important ethnological discovery ever made in the world. It would break all previous records of giants by nearly 10 feet as the tallest man known to anthropological research was only 8 feet 5 inches in height.”James Edwin Pearce (1868–1938), anthropology professor, was born on October 7, 1868, in Roxboro, North Carolina, the son of John Wiley and Lucy Jane (Drumwright) Pearce. Pearce graduated from Campbell High School in 1886 and taught there for two years. He received his B.Litt. in 1894 and his M.A. in 1895 from the University of Texas. From 1895 to 1917 he was principal of Austin High School; during that time he used leaves of absence to study anthropology and archaeology at the University of Chicago and the École d’Anthropologie of Paris. In 1917 Pearce became chairman of the Department of Institutional History at the University of Texas; he had the department’s name changed to Department of Anthropology in 1919. This was one of the earliest such departments in the United States. Pearce was responsible for establishing Texas archaeology as a major research field. He had advocated the establishment of a state museum and became the director of the Texas Memorial Museum when it was approved in 1938, though he died before it opened in 1939. He was coauthor with A. T. Jackson of A Prehistoric Rock Shelter in Val Verde County, Texas (1933). His other publications included articles on Texas archaeology and Tales That Dead Men Tell (1935), a discussion of the relevance of archaeology and anthropology to everyday life.

He was astounded by Dr. Jesse Walter Fewkes’s find.
http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fpe04

Doctor Jesse Walter Fewkes, Anthropologist that studied this amazing find:

Jesse Walter Fewkes (November 14, 1850 – 1930) was an American anthropologist, archaeologist, writer and naturalist. He was born in Newton, Massachusetts, and initially trained as a zoologist at Harvard University. He later turned to ethnological studies of the native tribes in the American Southwest.In 1889, with the resignation of noted ethnologist Frank Hamilton Cushing, Fewkes became leader of the Hemenway Southwestern Archaeological Expedition. While with this project, Fewkes documented the existing lifestyle and rituals of the Zuni and Hopi tribes. He made the first phonograph recordings of Zuni songs. Fewkes joined the Smithsonian’s Bureau of American Ethnology in 1895, becoming its director in 1918.Fewkes surveyed the ruins of a number of cultures in the American Southwest, and wrote many well received articles and books.He supervised the excavation of the Casa Grande ruins in southern Arizona, a Hohokam site, and the Mesa Verde ruins in southern Colorado, an Ancient Pueblo site. He particularly focused on the variants and styles of prehistoric Southwest Indian pottery, producing a number of volumes with carefully drawn illustrations. His work on the Mimbres and Sikyátki pottery styles eventually led to the reproduction of many of these traditional forms and images. The Hopi potter Nampeyo became his friend and reproduced the newly documented traditional designs in her own work.His research on precolumbian sites of Puerto Rico, Haiti, Cuba, Trinidad, and the Lesser Antilles were culminated into his 1907 book “Aborigines of Porto Rico and Neighboring Islands”. It’s an acclaimed text of early archaeology.
A-SKELETON-OF-A-MAN-18-FEET-TALL-IS-FOUND
2nd Verification Publication: Moberly Democrat. Location: Moberly, Missouri Issue Date: Sunday, July 27, 1919
 
“SKELETON OF A MAN 18 FEET TALL IS FOUND”.
Estimated He Weighed from 2,000 to 2,800 Pounds and Lived 2,800 Years Ago. Austin, Tex, July 26.-“If the report that the fossilized giant 18 feet tall found near Seymour, Tex., is true, is it the most important ethical discovery ever made in the world,” remarked Dr. J. E. Pearce, professor of anthropology of the University of Texas. “It would break all previous records of giants by nearly 10 feet as the tallest man known to anthropological research was only 8 feet 5 inches in height.” The skeleton is in possession of W.J. McKinney, Houston, Tex., oil prospector, who found it, and has been seen by a number of people who vouch for the size of the relic of a heretofore unknown race. McKinney, while making an excavation between – the Brazos and the Wichita rivers, came upon the fossilized skeleton near the surface. Mc-Kinney writes: “I estimate that this man weighed from 2,000 to 2,500 pounds. Accod-ing to my deductions he lived about 2,800 years ago. The skull is six times the size of that of an extraordinary man. McKinney does not explain how he arrived at the figures as to the probable period of the existence of this remarkable man. It is probable that the bones of the giant will be donated to the Smithsonian Institution, which, under the direction of Dr. J. Walter Fewkes, is now conducting anthropological research work in Texas.” http://newspaperarchive.com/moberly-democrat/1919-07-27/

 

“Donated to the Smithsonian Institute”? 
 
What is interesting is that Fewkes joined the Rockefeller – Smithsonmian’s Bureau of American Ethnology , later becoming its director around the same time as he was finding giants. Fewkes was one of the first voices for government preservation of ancient sites in the American Southwest. In the American Anthropologist Fewkes appealed for protective legislation. Everyone who has done any research knows that these are not Indian Sites. Even the folklore, books, & the Hopi state that the Giants built the mounds before they arrived. Are these Indian Protection Acts really about the protection or are they more about protecting us from the truth?

 
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One response to “Giant Skeleton Of A Man 18 Feet Tall – Astounds Famous Anthropologists

  1. Cash – sorry not to get back w you sooner – I can not even find your original comment. I do not spend much time on the internet as far as web master or you tube comments.

    I have not heard from Col SC for some time… I fear his health is not very good. If you have seen him on the social media sites – let me know – I do not have Facebook or the others. send to @ TruthwChrit at msn dot com… Blessings

    Like

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